Cultural Typhoon in Europe 2016 (Vienna)

INFO

Places and Spaces of Cultural Production in East Asia

International Graduate Conference / Cultural Typhoon in Europe 2016
22nd to 25th September 2016, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Vienna

 

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The (re)production and consumption of culture—e.g. art, literature, music, popular media, or (reinvented) traditional practices—has become a central aspect of modern societies. Buzzwords like “global culture” and “internet phenomenon” evoke pictures of a connected, homogenous modern world in which categories like place and space are irrelevant, or at its best, degraded to labels for marketing products. Therefore the understanding of “culture” has become even more fluid. Everyone is invited to freely construct their own cultural identity through the worldwide “cultural supermarket” (Mathews 2000), to express oneself through the possibilities of modern communication technologies—everybody can be a producer of culture, anywhere, anytime.

Behind these new opportunities lies an economic order that constantly produces new sites of crisis, conflicts and exploitation—but also of resistance and defiance. Paradoxically, we live in a fragmented, heterogeneous world, where the differences between streets, towns, regions and countries have become even greater. Therefore, it is necessary to question concepts of space and place limited by the frameset of nation states as well as to overcome the dichotomies of centre-periphery or global-local. This conference refers to spaces and places not only in a strictly geographical or physical sense, but also takes into account fictional, virtual, imagined or perceived forms.

In East Asia these conflicting experiences can be seen clearly: Japanese popular culture has become a global fashion, while Chinese factories produce the actual technology products that made it possible. This represents a case in point that the contemporary state of cultural production is irrevocably linked to the places and spaces of production, distribution and consumption.

The Cultural Typhoon in Vienna focused on places and spaces of cultural production in East Asia and seeks to establish a dialogue on this topic amongst postgraduate students from diverse fields. Perspectives from Area Studies concerned with East Asia or singular countries are as welcome as Cultural Studies and Social Sciences approaches dealing with this topic.

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The Organizing Team 2016

Erich Havranek, Higuchi Ryô, Tamara Kamerer, Peter Mühleder, Florian Purkarthofer, Jasmin Rückert, Claudia Schmidt, Johannes Wilhelm
Tamara Kamerer
Tamara
Florian Purkarthofer
Florian
Johannes Wilhelm
Joha
Peter Mühleder
Peter
Erich Havranek
Erich
Claudia Schmidt
Claudia
Our Wonderful Interns:

Elisabeth Kalcher, Julia Ramprecht, Daniel Zaruba

Julia Ramprecht
Julia
Elisabeth Kalcher
Liz
Moderators:

Theresa Aichinger, Peter Fankhauser

Art & ACTIVISM

Title:             “Abandonment is Human”
Slot:              ART-Slot 1
Date&Time: Thursday 22nd September 2016, 16:00 – 16:30
Room:           Blue Room

WILHELM, Johannes (University of Vienna, Austria)
Title Abandonment is Human
Abstract

 

In terms of anthropology and history of humankind, most places have been abandoned over the time. Abandonment seems to be an inevitable fate of any settlement of human beings. On the other hand, at least until the dawn of capitalism, humankind has tend to colonialize places and spaces by using or consuming natural resouces of a certain place more or less in a sustainable way, yet, in most cases until depletion. In our times, reasons for abandonment seem to be found within the socioeconomic space. People abandon places to find better condition for a living within their post­industrial setting. The audiovisual collage presented by the author (Friend of HAL) is a comparable perspective to the fictional cameraman (Sandor Krasna) in the “Sans Soleil” by Chris Marker. The sound compositions inspired by Brian Enos approach of ambience are based on loops, pointing to a repeating structure of history, while slight changes of patterns are indicating change.

While being a fieldworker with emic access, the author tries to transcendent the present of rural Japan into a history of memories that are obviously moving to a state of abandonment, too.

Biography

 

Made in Germany and born in Japan in the year of the Osaka Expo, Joha grew up between both cultures. His academic work focuses basically on the anthropology of rural Japan, yet, he also worked on other fields such as media, folk religion or transcultural history.


Title:             “Documentaries of Japanese Artisans in Aachen”
Slot:              ART-Slot 2
Date&Time: Friday 23nd September 2016, 16:30 – 17:00
Room:           Green Room

DOI, Takashi & HIGUCHI, Ryō
Title Documentaries of Japanese Artisans in Aachen
Abstract

 

For thirty-five years, RWTH Aachen University has conducted workshops in the traditional Japanese artisanship of sakan, a type of Japanese plasterwork. A talented Japanese plaster worker, or sakan shokunin, from the younger generation has served as the instructor and taught workshop participants how to make traditional Japanese walls using German materials. This year, in addition to the sakan shokunin, a Japanese thatcher, or kayabuki shokunin, came to the workshops and made a new roof using European materials.

Now, we are delighted to be able to present two documentaries of the workshops which ran from the 19th through the 28th of July 2016: the first shows how Japanese walls were built by the sakan shokunin and the workshop participants, and the second illustrates how a roof was built by the kayabuki shokunin and workshop participants. The documentary not only explains the procedures involved in making traditional Japanese houses, but it also shows how craftspeople utilize traditional materials in Germany where the climate is different from that of Japan. The documentary enables viewers to understand how craftspeople interpret traditional Japanese architecture in Germany.

Biography

Ryo Higuchi is a PhD student at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, and Visiting PhD student at the University of Vienna in the field of architectural history. His area of interest is architectural locality, what factors bring locality into architecture, and whether these factors are geographically or chronologically universal.

Takashi Doi was born in 1982 in Japan. After 3 years of wandering around Japan, he studied French literature at Sophia (Joti) University of Tokyo and got an MA there. He worked as editor of the music magazine “ Gendai Guitar ” and worked as assistant in Meiji University of Tokyo. And since 2015 he studies Romance Studies in terms of Literature, Linguistics, Media Studies and Cultural Studies at Vienna University.


Title:             “Dance”
Slot:              ART-Slot 3
Date&Time: Thursday 23rd September 2016, 18:00 – 18:30
Room:

HOLL, Peter
Title
Abstract

 

Biography

 


Title:             “Cosmic Drama”
Slot:              ART-Slot 4
Date&Time: Saturday 24th September 2016, 12:30 – 13:00
Room:           Green Room

KIM, Ji Sun & ARNSTRÖM, Pia
Title Cosmic Drama
Abstract

 

The myths of Jeju are full of gods and goddesses like “Grandmother Seoulmundae”, the goddess of creation, and diving into the salty waters of the ocean surrounding it, the diving women, Haenyeo, independent and strong.

On Jeju, different ideologies, religions, old myths and new influences are absorbed and transformed into something new. This transformation and merging of influences is the inspiration for the visuals and sounds of the exhibition.

Composition and performance are based on M. Schaffer’s theory of the soundscape in relation to Gestalt psychology, “keytone sounds”, “signals”, and sound prints or “soundmarks”. The songs of the Haenyeo, as well as the sound of the island´s nature are incorporated into the „soundwalk“ to recreate the „acoustic community“.

The paths of the Jeju Olle, the hiking trail winding its way all around the island, have been rendered in porcelain and connected in the form of an egg. Using the classic Pepper´s Ghost technique, we want to evoke the mystique of the myths still alive on Jeju Island.

The acoustic space of the performance, the visual space of the exhibition and the emotional space of the audience´s reaction merge to form a unique environment.

Biography

This is the second collaboration of Pia Arnström and Ji Sun Kim after the Project “Influx Korea”, which was exhibited at the Korea Kulturhaus Vienna in 2015.

Pia Arnström was born in 1974 in Sundsvall, Schweden. She studied 2001-2006 at the University of Applied Arts Vienna and lives and works in Vienna and Vike, Sweden.

Ji Sun Kim is a lecturer for Korean Studies at the Institute for East Asian Studies. She received her Master degree and Instrumental & Voice Education in Recorder and an Artist Diploma at McGill University as well as her PhD from the Department of Cultural Management and Cultural Studies at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna.

Ji Sun Kim started her professional career in recorder music after winning the Recorder Contest Tokyo, the International Competition for Solo Recorder, Novezamky, and top rankings at the Montreal International Recorder Competiton and the Early Music America Medieval/Renaissance Performance Competition. She performed a series of concerts in Spain with her ensemble Musica Fantasia,

winners of the 2010 Musica Antigua Obra Social la Caixa. On invitation of the Federal Chancellery of Austria the ensemble played a series of concerts at Palais Porcia in Vienna.

You can download the information as pdf here.

PANELS

Title:             “Translocal Multiculturalism”
Slot:              PANEL 13
Date&Time: Saturday 24th September 2016, 16:30 – 18:00
Room:           Green Room
Host:             Higuchi Ryō

PRESENTERS

NOBLEZA, Randy T.  (De la Salle University, Philippines)
Autonomous Knowledge Production in the Philippine Archipelago: selected research/studies center in Pampanga, Cebu and Mindanao

Daisuke TAKEYA
Should we admit our failure in Multiculturalism (but still investigating it)?
Case studies from Field Trip Project

NOBLEZA, Randy T.  (De la Salle University, Philippines)
Title Autonomous Knowledge Production in the Philippine Archipelago: selected research/ studies center in Pampanga, Cebu and Mindanao
Abstract

 

Being autonomous is the new wave of Philippine Studies, however it has been both a unifying and divisive project. The paper interrogates the institutional memories of selected local studies centers in Pampanga, Cebu and Mindanao. Guided by Grounded Theory, the researcher has been able to draw some common and unique characteristics. What is common among the Center for Kapampangan Studies (CKS), Cebuano Studies Center (CSC) and the Mindanawon Initiatives for Cultural Dialogue (MICD) is both the research and library/archives. On the other hand, what separates one from the other is its unique characteristics. Holy Angel University’s CKS has a Kapampangan Art Museum while the University of San Carlos’ CSC has a conduit office which coordinates its Diploma/Certificate courses on Heritage Studies/ Cebuano Language and Literature. In addition, Ateneo de Davao University’s MICD serves as a neutral space for differing and contesting sides of interest groups in Mindanao.  Locating CKS, CSC and MICD in the spectrum of Philippine Studies, it is in-between the national and the local. From its beginnings with Jose Rizal  (1889) and Isabelo de los Reyes (1887) until the proliferation of Area Studies during the early 20th century and the indigenization movement in the 1960s,  Autonomous Philippine Studies is the emergent field in the 21st century.

Keywords: Local/ Area Studies, Philippine Studies, Autonomous Knowledge Production, Center for Kapampangan Studies, Cebuano Studies Center, Mindanawon Initiatives for Cultural Dialogue

Question

What dynamics is taking place between local and national discourse in knowledge production. Likewise, I am addressing the common and unique characteristics of local research/ studies centres in the country.Finally, what is the full spectrum of Philippine Studies from its colonial beginnings to becoming autonomous?

Method
Biography

 

My full name is Randy Tampon Nobles. My institutional affiliation is Department of Filipino, College of Liberal Arts, De La Salle University Manila. I am an assistant professor 3 at the Marinduque State College and about to have my final defense on August 11. Hopefully by October this year, I would be graduating from my doctoral studies.

Daisuke TAKEYA
Title Should we admit our failure in Multiculturalism (but still investigating it)?
Case studies from Field Trip Project
Abstract

 

Field Trip Project is a traveling art exhibition using Japanese elementary school backpacks surplus sent as relief supplies for the Great East Japan Earthquake of March, 2011. It intends to intervene with issues particular at destinations both affected and unaffected areas by natural disasters in recent years. Created by over a hundred international artists linked in Asian countries, each backpack is solo exhibit(Space) that is mobile and interacts with people at each destination(Places), creating multiple layers of new meanings (cultural productions). Should we admit our failure in Multiculturalism (but still investigating it)? Case studies from Field Trip Project discusses issues through the case studies of the project. Destinations in Japan(twenty) include Onagwa Temporary Housing, Prince Takamado Gallery at the Embassy of Canada, Roppongi Art Night, Shinjuku Creators Festa, and the Maritime Museum of BC in Canada, Vargas Museum in the Philippines, Ruangrupa and Aceh Tsunami Museum in Indonesia. Financial support includes Pola Art Foundation, the Singapore Arts Council, BC Arts Council of Canada, Toyota Canada, Shinjuku Ward, the Japan Foundation, Manila,  the Japan Foundation, Jakarta and Asian Center.

Question
Method
Biography

Born and raised in Japan, Daisuke Takeya obtained a MFA from the New York Academy of Art and received BFA from the School of Visual Arts in NYC. Currently based in Toronto, Canada, Daisuke has had numerous solo and group exhibitions internationally including the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Chongqing Changjiang Contemporary Art Museum (China), Fukushima Contemporary Art Biannual, Scotia Bank Nuit Blanche(Toronto), SVA Gallery(NYC), Wagner College Gallery(NYC), Kyoto Art Center, Sezon Art Program (Tokyo), Roppongi Art Night, the Japan Foundation, Toronto, and the Prince Takamado Gallery at the Embassy of Canada in Japan.

INFO

Title:             “Cultivating Safe Spaces”
Slot:              PANEL 12
Date&Time: Saturday 24th September 2016, 16:30 – 18:00
Room:           Blue Room
Host:             Jasmin Rückert

PRESENTERS

Panda (Kyushu University, Japan)
Queer Clubs in Universities: A Case Study of Japanese Universities

PISSIN, Annika (Lund University, Sweden)
Where to hide in contemporary China? Children’s space of their own

ANG, Roslynn (New York University, USA)
Institutional danger and safe spaces: Publics, counter-publics, internet and intimacies for the Ainu in Sapporo

Panda (Kyushu University, Japan)
Title Queer Clubs in Universities: A Case Study of Japanese Universities
Abstract

 

Universities not only provide individuals more opportunities for the future but also serve as a transition to society. Moreover, experiences at universities may influence and shape individuals’ identities. Previous studies indicate that queer youth have higher chance of experiencing discrimination and bullying at schools which may lead to negative impact on their health and well-being. However, very few studies have been done in a university context.
This project aims to present an understanding on queer individuals and campus environment of universities in Japan through the lens of queer clubs. Based on surveys with various respondents, this study hopes to elucidate the role that queer clubs play in universities as well as connections between queer clubs and surrounding factors. We aim to point out problems that take place in Japanese universities regarding queer issues and how queer clubs cope with these matters. In addition, drawing on some successful and failed cases of the queer clubs, we hope to justify the reasons behind the success and failure and come up with approaches on creating a safer and more inclusive space for queer university students.

Question

What roles do queer clubs play in Japanese universities? What are the connections between queer clubs and surrounding factors (students, faculty, institutions, SNS, etc.)?

Method

Quantitative and qualitative approaches are applied in this study.

Biography

 

Panda is a graduate student in the Faculty of Integrate Science for Global Society at Kyushu University. Their main research interests are issues related to gender and sexualities. Apart from their MA thesis on Japanese college students’ attitudes toward male homosexuality, Panda is currently working on newer projects on queer clubs in universities and queer foreigners in Japan. Panda is also working as one of the block leaders for Stonewall Japan, an organization aiming to build safer and inclusive space for LGBTQIA+ individuals in Japan.

PISSIN, Annika (Lund University, Sweden)
Title Where to hide in contemporary China? Children’s space of their own
Abstract

 

Children need secrets. They also need time in order to occupy space and claim it their own. While creating space of their own works fairly well in rural environments, urban areas that are dominated by a dense conglomeration of adults, their consumption and their transport space pose some more complications for children to transform into space of their own. Even more complicated are places of mass education, including boarding schools. Originally adult-centered, Lefebvre’s work about how social space is used finally, receives increasing attention in childhood studies, shifting the focus to space as an important aspect in understanding children’s lives. At the same time, the notion of space gets a digital twist, and children’s space can be found increasingly in their mobile phones or the internet.
In this presentation I explore what digital space for children means, embedded in the theory of Lefebvre’s production of space. The focus lies on the necessity for children to have secrets and space of their own. Adult forces against this claim to secrecy – not privacy – make use of educational institutions and the domination of spatial infrastructure in the internet and beyond, including surveillance. How can children possibly live their secrets and what is the drive of adults to prevent them from it?
Based on fieldwork in rural China about how children use space, websites created for children, and the global history of shrinking space and accelerating time, this presentation proposes to offer a glimpse into children’s hiding zones in China and explains why and how children should be left alone there.

Question
Method
Biography

Annika Pissin is a researcher at the Center for East and South-East Asian Studies since 2010. She studied classical and modern Chinese as well as Anthropology in Heidelberg, Tainan and Leiden and attained a doctoral degree from Leiden University. Since 2013 she is member of the research group “Digital China”. From 2014 to 2015 she was also a member of the Pufendorf research cluster “Sustainable Welfare”.

ANG, Roslynn (New York University, USA)
Title Institutional danger and safe spaces: Publics, counter-publics and intimacies for the Ainu
Abstract

 

Institutional support and national recognition are necessary for the survival of vulnerable cultures, even though it narrowly defines minority membership and restricts their agency. Research on communities facing this conundrum enables a nuanced approach that goes beyond a simple binary. Indigenous to northern Japan, the Ainu were first forcibly assimilated, and thereafter perceived as bearers of endangered culture that require state support. Consequently, they are accused of leeching on state support and performing ‘inauthentic’ culture. Using ethnographic fieldwork, I follow two members of the Ainu community involved in performance groups: One who disavows all ties to state institutions to perform in underground cafes and another who works in an institution that supports Ainu cultural activities by day and assists with the former’s performances by night. I show how my interlocutors strategically navigate the dangerous traverse between state institutions and sub-cultural spaces. They are precariously located in the intersections of nation, state, the academia, Ainu and local communities, and entangled in issues over authenticity, knowledge production and indigenous rights. Movement between these spaces is dangerous but ironically, necessary for their survival. This paper addresses the larger issues of nation, state, race and the ongoing but unacknowledged everyday colonialism in Japan.

Question How do Ainu performers, as indigenous minorities living within a supposedly homogenous society, navigate issues of race, nation, belonging and indigenous rights through their everyday lives and performance practices?
Method

A mixture of interviews, life-stories and participant observation as both performer and audience member, with primary data from institutions and secondary sources from Japanese academic texts as both intertextual and contextual counterparts to the ethnographic data.

Biography

Roslynn earned her BA at National University of Singapore, MA in Sociology at Hokkaido University and is pursuing a PhD in East Asian Studies, New York University. She is the webmaster for Sapporo Upopo Hozonkai, an Ainu traditional performance group. Having received grants to Ryukyu University and Hokkaido University, she has an extensive knowledge on the peripheries of Japan and their indigenous minorities. Her current research focuses on contemporary Ainu performance groups in an urban context and issues on race and nation in Japan.

INFO

Title:             “The Space of the Unsaid”
Slot:              PANEL 11
Date&Time: Saturday 24th September 2016, 14:30 – 16:00
Room:           Green Room
Host:             [TBA]

PRESENTERS

NOWAK, Wojciech (Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland)
Looking at the text. E-moji, Japanese contribution to global indirect communication

HAVRANEK, Erich (University Of Vienna, Austria)
Discourse Control and Fuseji: Smuggling Subversive Ideas into Restricted Spaces

SHIROTA, Nanase (University of Cambridge, UK)
An Ethnography of Listening: Japanese listening behaviour in different places and spaces

NOWAK, Wojciech (Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland)

Title Looking at the text. E-moji, Japanese contribution to global indirect communication
Abstract

 

Nowadays the written text has come to inhabit not only the private space of an individual, but also the common space, both real- world and virtual one. Growing importance of new ways of indirect communication, caused people around the globe to become more dependent on the written word. The Internet supplies its user with bigger and more diversified audience, not always being able to read needless to say understand the displayed words. That poses a question: How can one facilitate semantic value present in the form, the very body of the text? What could be the new lingua franca of the Internets?

The aim of this paper is to investigate the paradigm shift in indirect communication patterns, from verbal to visual, based on e-moji, Japanese “picture letters” phenomenon.

The author will confront the examples of historical (entertainment, education, an aid for illiterate) and modern purpose of using e-moji, namely transmition of non- verbal meaning, such as emotions, within the written text. Originally created on paper, presently the creative process of their cultural production takes place in the virtual space. Although an invention of pre- digital, era, the author believes, that e-moji has evolved from site specific, national, to a global phenomenon.

Question

What qualities of Japanese e-moji make them contribute to global indirect communication and how?

Method

In the research the author uses qualitative method.  Collected historical and present- day primary data are compared and analyzed in attempt to answer the Question.

Biography

 

Assistant at Department of Japanese Studies, Nicolaus Copernicus University. Presently pursues PhD in Japanese literature, focusing on the function of visual aspects of a text as a medium for Japanese culture in Santō Kyōden’s works. In teaching practice, he tries to looks for new ways of working with the students by incorporating ideas of body awareness in the teaching process.

HAVRANEK, Erich (University Of Vienna, Austria)
Title Discourse Control and Fuseji: Smuggling Subversive Ideas into Restricted Spaces
Abstract

 

Most recent approaches to censorship base their theoretical framework on the works of Foucault, Bourdieu or Luhman. Using different terms, their concepts center around the question, who is allowed to enter the restricted space of public discourse – who may speak in public, on what topic and with what legitimation.

Fuseji are, at first glance, rather focused on details and do not immediately prevent an author from speaking entirely. Which is one reason why authorities were dissatisfied with their application. Abel goes as far as to compare fuseji with stylistic devices like metaphors, because both enable the publication of texts that contain controversial ideas or tabooed images (cf. Abel 2012). However, in contrast to stylistic devices fuseji do not hide censorship and therefore work against a main function of censorship. As Karatani explained, the censoring of censorship is the fundamental objective of censorship (cf. Karatani 1996).

Considering that editors openly showed the influence and restrictions of censorship while still publishing texts containing taboo topics, are fuseji, then, censorship at all? To answer this question, I will use the censorship concept of Stephan Buchloh (cf. Buchloh 2003) to illustrate the position of fuseji in relation to other forms of censorship. This concept has been established with the aim to enable analyses of acts of censorship in various historical periods, countries and media.

Based on this, I will show that fuseji, while having specific characteristics, can be placed in a general, abstract concept of censorship and therefore can neither be compared to stylistic devices on the same level, nor can they be seen as a unique Japanese form of censorship.

On the other hand, I will argue that fuseji had a subversive function as well, as they enabled authors to circumvent discourse control to smuggle controversial ideas into the public discourse under very noses of censors, and I will discuss the ambiguous role editors played in this process.

Question
Method
Biography

Erich Havranek is a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of East Asian Studies (Japanese Studies) at the University of Vienna. He holds a B.A. in Japanese Studies (2009) and an M.A. (2010) in Comparative Literature, both from the University of Vienna. His research interests are Japanese literature in translation and Japanese media and publishing before 1945.

SHIROTA, Nanase (University of Cambridge, UK)
Title An Ethnography of Listening: Japanese listening behaviour in different places and spaces
Abstract

 

What kind of social order or unwritten rules do listeners unintentionally/intentionally follow in face-to-face conversation and how different places influence these unwritten rules for listeners? I found and named one of the unwritten rules of listening, which is nagara listening, a kind of listening as Multitasking. In this presentation, I would like to delineate several Japanese nagara listening to show how different places and spaces restrict behaviour and rules of listening. I will give some examples about different sizes, purposes and formality of places based on ethnographical fieldwork in Tokyo and analysis of TV dramas. For example, I found that the greater the physical distance between speakers and listeners and the weaker the hierarchical relationship, the more the extent of permitted listeners’ multitasks would expand. Moreover, listeners are not only influenced by places and spaces, but also they try to create comfortable mental spaces between others by nagara listening. Overall, I conclude that physical places and spaces govern listeners’ behaviour, especially the aspect of nagara listening, whilst mental spaces are created by listeners.

Question

How do different places influence listeners’ behaviour?

Method

Ethnography (Fieldwork in Japan and analysis of TV dramas)

Biography

Nanase Shirota is a PhD student in Japanese Studies in University of Cambridge with particular interests in listening and interactive communication. She received her master’s degrees in social science from Keio University and University of Glasgow. She worked to publish several books related to monologue style oral history (kikigaki) and taught this skills in Japan.

INFO

Title:             “House, Heritage and Material Spaces”
Slot:              PANEL 10
Date&Time: Saturday 24th September 2016, 14:30 – 16:00
Room:           Blue Room
Host:             [TBA]

PRESENTERS

COMIN, Jeremy (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR)
Cultural sustainability and heritage revitalisation in Hong Kong: the case of Mei Ho House

CONSTANTINESCU, Cezar (Sophia University, Japan)
Dōjunkai Revisited – Memories of Modern Living in Tokyo

HIGUCHI, Ryō (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
Architectural Characteristics as the Cultural Production of Locals: The Case of Byzantine Architecture

COMIN, Jeremy (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR)
Title Cultural sustainability and heritage revitalisation in Hong Kong: the case of Mei Ho House
Abstract

 

Hong Kong is a fast changing and transient city where the need for heritage conservation has only recently been fully acknowledged. Conservation projects in Hong Kong have often been criticized for their narrow understanding of heritage and top-down approach. Cultural heritage is an ambiguous concept. It is a major aspect of everyday life rooted in space and time as well as an attribute of identity and sense of place which have no clearly defined boundaries. In 2007, the Government launched the Revitalisation Scheme, a public-private partnership. Its mission was to preserve the local culture, enhance public participation and create job opportunities by proposing government-owned buildings for adaptive reuse to non-profit organisations. Mei Ho House was integrated in the first batch of the scheme and transformed into a youth hostel with an exhibition detailing the life in the post-war public housing estates before opening to the public in 2013. Exploring how the different stakeholders – the state, the association and the local community – benefit from the project through the lenses of visual (re)presentation, tourism and volunteerism may lead us to a better understanding of the relation between cultural heritage and sustainability.

Question

How do the different stakeholders benefit from Mei Ho House’s revitalisation project?

Method

My Methods include textual analysis, participant observation and in-depth interviews.

Biography

 

Jeremy Comin is a PhD student in cultural studies at the Hong Kong Baptist University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Humanities and Creative Writing. He holds a master’s degree of international law and a master’s degree in Asian studies from the University of Geneva in Switzerland. His research interests include space, urban regeneration and cultural heritage in Hong Kong.

CONSTANTINESCU, Cezar (Sophia University, Japan)
Title Dōjunkai Revisited – Memories of Modern Living in Tokyo
Abstract

 

Following the 1923 Great Kantō Earthquake, the state-founded Dōjunkai (同潤会) built wooden dwellings in the affected areas and later modern ferroconcrete apartment houses in Tokyo and Yokohama. Other projects included the care and retraining of victims of the disaster who suffered from permanent physical disabilities, slum clearances and the erection of detached houses for workers and employees. The activities in the last years of the foundation’s existence stood under strong influence from the militarization of Japan caused by the outbreak of the war with China.

In 2013, with the Uenoshita Apartment complex being torn down, the Dōjunkai disappeared from the Tokyo cityscape. On the other hand, the current year marks the 10th anniversary of the Omotesandō Hills commercial and residential complex and proclaimed spiritual successor to the Aoyama Apartment house. I interpret these two events as an invitation to reevaluate my previous research on the topic presented as a master’s thesis in 2006, to revisit the former locations of the Dōjunkai and to examine how these pioneer projects of public housing are remembered today.

Question

How did the Dōjunkai contribute to introduce new forms of urban living in and around Tokyo and how is this contribution evaluated today?

Method

I take a hermeneutical approach and analyze secondary sources, contemporary with the Dōjunkai as well as recently published.

Biography

 

Cezar Constantinescu graduated from Vienna University with a Magister (MA) in Japanese Studies. After working several years in language education and corporate training he returned to Vienna University for a program in Teaching German as a Foreign Language. He is currently a non-tenured lecturer at Sophia University in Tokyo through the lectureship program of the Austrian Agency for International Mobility and Cooperation in Education and Research (OeAD).

HIGUCHI, Ryō (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)
Title Architectural Characteristics as the Cultural Production of Locals:
The Case of Byzantine Architecture
Abstract

 

When culture is regarded as the ideas, customs and social behaviour of a particular group of people or society, architecture may be one of the spaces and places where cultural production occurs. However, in what way is the relationship between architectural characteristics and the culture of a locality understood? And, if there is a culture of locality, are these geographically and chronologically universal? This study considers the Byzantine Empire (395–1453), which governed the eastern Mediterranean coast, and the church architecture of that era because of the strong regional characteristics (locality) present in the architecture. Byzantine architecture, which includes the architecture of churches, is usually studied in terms of building planning. In contrast, this study approaches Byzantine architecture from the perspective of spaces and places where cultural production occurs and reconsiders the three-dimensional characteristics of Byzantine architecture. Using the research information obtained from my onsite survey, this paper examines the concepts of locality and of Byzantine churches as space. The church buildings create a complex of spaces simply composed of walls, ceilings and floors. These diverse spaces illustrate construction methods and how local materials are used.

Question

What is locality in architecture and what is the factor of locality?

Method

Analysing the geographical distribution factor in the architectural figure.

Biography

 

Ryo Higuchi is a PhD student at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, and Visiting PhD student at the University of Vienna in the field of architectural history. His area of interest is architectural locality, what factors bring locality into architecture, and whether these factors are geographically or chronologically universal.

INFO

Title:             “Vienna Calling”
Slot:              PANEL 9
Date&Time: Saturday 24th September 2016, 10:00 – 12:30
Room:           Blue Room
Host:             Tamara Kamerer

PRESENTERS

KOMIYA, Masayasu (Yokohama National University, Japan)
Image of Vienna as a “Music-Metropolitan” by Japanese travel materials [Vienna Key Note]

TANAKA, Rina (Meiji University, Japan)
Post-Globalization in the Genre Musical? – A Case of ‘Ever-growing’ Musicals from Vienna via Japan

SCHMIDT, Claudia (Momoyama Gakuin Daigaku)
Japanese tea culture in Vienna

KOMIYA, Masayasu (Yokohama National University, Japan)
Title Image of Vienna as a “Music-Metropolitan” by Japanese travel materials
Abstract

 

Looking at only surface, not at depth… it may be characteristic and problem of tourism. In Japanese tourism, on that a lot of travel guides or travel flyers depend, the image of Vienna is described almost every time with catch phrase “Music-Metropolitan” since long time and also today.

But what point of view does the image base on? What kind of phenomenon does it focus on? What do they look at and look over, when they built such image?

In this presentation from cultural historical view, I would like to describe especially about the topos in Vienna, where music was cultivated, although most of Japanese travel materials don’t take care of it.

Biography

 

TANAKA, Rina (Meiji University, Japan)
Title Post-Globalization in the Genre Musical? – A Case of ‘Ever-growing’ Musicals from Vienna via Japan
Abstract

 

This presentation gives a focus on the interactive practice on musicals between Vienna and Japan since the 1990s.

In 1996, an extraordinary adaptation of the Viennese musical Elisabeth (originally by die Vereinigten Bühnen Wien; VBW in 1992) was performed by a Japanese theater company, Takarazuka Revue Company, in which all roles were played only by women. Eight years later, the other adaptation started running by Toho Company. Both adaptations have not only uniquely developed but also been winning the stable popularity in Japan.

The success by such considerable alterations in Japan destined for VBW: unlike musical productions from Broadway and West End, which demand strict adherence to the original, VBW let the works be adapted  to  the  individual  culture(s)  by  local  theaters  to  a  large  extent.  Furthermore, not only sanctioning localization, VBW brings those adaptations into their ‘original’ performance in Vienna. The new wave of these ‘ever-growing’ musicals is about to find a new direction. Nowadays, a couple of Toho’s productions are made by the leading team of Viennese musicals. For example, Marie Antoinette was performed in Tokyo in 2006, then exported to three countries. In a sense, Vienna and Japan share their interests owing to their mutually beneficial partnership.

Question Can the interaction on musicals between Vienna and Japan be seen as a case of the post-globalization?
Method Literature and archive research (criticisms, playbills, recorded materials), interviews, observation
Biography Master student at Meiji University, Tokyo
SCHMIDT, Claudia (Momoyama Gakuin Daigaku)
Title Japanese tea culture in Vienna
Abstract Japanese tea culture is strongly associated with cha no yu (Japanese tea ceremony). Like in other East-Asian countries, tea in Japan is both an everyday beverage and a symbol for hospitality.  Cha no yu forms one culture which unifies many other phenomenons of Japanese traditional culture, such as calligraphy, gardening or architecture. Tea drinking is connected to a cultural identity of the country, but cha no yu also has a long history with nationalism. Further, it is highly institutionalized by the iemoto-system (a hierarchical system for a school of tea with a Grand Master).

The question I want to address in my talk is in which form or forms is Japanese tea culture represented in Vienna. I want to focus on an analysis of the institutions which act as providers of Japanese tea culture in Vienna. These are mainly tea houses and the representatives of the schools of tea. What is offered in the tea houses? Who are the consumers? How and where is tea ceremony enacted? What image of Japanese culture is created? I also want to examine if it is made to fit Austrian consumers tastes or quite the opposite, is it made even more “exotic” on purpose.

Question How is Japanese tea culture represented in Vienna? Is it a dislocated reproduction of culture or is a new “Japanese” tea culture is being created?
Method Analysis of qualitative interviews with representatives of the institutions which act as providers of Japanese tea culture in Vienna
Biography Nov. 2014-Feb. ’15:    Research Internship, Kyoto International Manga Museum, International Manga Research Center
Since April 2014: Postdoc researcher at Momoyama Gakuin Daigaku  (St. Andrew’s University)
Apr. 2014: PhD. Momoyama Gakuin Daigaku (Cultural Studies, Title of the Dissertation: Tea in 21st century Japan. It’s forms and significance.)
Jan. 2010: M.Phil. University of Vienna (Japanology)
INFO

Title:             “Media Shaping Identity”
Slot:              PANEL 8
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 16:30 – 17:30
Room:           Blue Room
Host:            Theresa Aichinger

PRESENTERS

HO, Hoi Ting Bonnie (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR)
Regional and Class Division in China Reality TV

CHEN, I-Hsiao Michelle (The University of Texas at Austin, USA)
Puns Intended – Constructing a Localist Taiwanese Linguistic Identity in Contemporary Comedy Films

HO, Hoi Ting Bonnie (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR)
Title Modern nation building in China reality television: Class division in nation and inter-nation
Abstract

 

Importing popular culture from Korean Wave, provincial satellites in China have been broadcasting adapted reality television shows in order to lower production cost and improve programme quality. The translated and indigenized versions from Korean to Chinese have manifested a strong sense of locality, screening local issues and everyday living which reaffirm the characteristics of Chinese-ness. In the rise of economic status in the globe, the media representation also reflects modern nation building and the making of modern subjects. Particularly under globalization, industrialization and urbanization, Chinese self-identification displayed in popular culture reflects its comprehension of the Asian world. This paper aims to deploy the correspondence between the middle-class gaze and the contemporary China state’s perspective. By examining TV shows that include foreign celebrities’ participation as well as the shooting of the rural area, I would like to discuss China’s intended role to play in the modern world. First, I will explore the regional class division within different China’s provinces, how the portrayal of countryside and working class make a connection with mass audiences, but as well objectify the grass-root for consumption purpose. And then I will move onto make sense of the projection of China in media and its position in Asia. Studying China’s interaction with periphery culture and nations on screen, I will delineate the promulgation nationalistic sentiment and justification of cultural tradition through popular culture, and its agenda to stand out from other Asian countries. From both national and international paradigms, I would argue that the bourgeois gaze determines quite a lot in the making of modern subjectivity and national identity.

Question

This research will look into the media representation of modern subjects and the capitalist gaze in China reality television, in relation to the construction of national image.

Method It will be conducted mainly by textual and contextual analysis.
Biography

 

I am an MPhil student in the department of Humanities and Creative Writing at Hong Kong Baptist University. My research interest includes Asian studies, media and cultural studies.

CHEN, I-Hsiao Michelle (The University of Texas at Austin, USA)
Title Puns Intended – Constructing a Localist Taiwanese Linguistic Identity in Contemporary Comedy Films
Abstract

 

The contemporary localist films in Taiwan highlight linguistic dissonance to portray, and simultaneously construct, a native Taiwan identity.  The incorporation of indigenous languages in film is often branded as progressive and disruptive, and is part of the localist movement advocating independence. In this paper, I analyze two films, David Loman and Night Market Hero. They belong to the genre of low-brow comedies strategize and use linguistic dissonance to depict and valorize a Taiwan identity, which is commercially viable in a niche market. Although may be negatively evaluated by outsiders, these comedies utilize emotionally saturated use of languages to foster a sense of indigenous community. I study how the specificities of languages in the films subvert and replace the fixed linguistic and political hierarchy dominated by the national language, Mandarin (guoyu), and contribute to personal and national identity formation by way of filmic devices such as actors’ utterance and subtitles.

Question

How is the “local” produced vocally in contemporary comedies in Taiwan?

Method Textual and filmic analysis
Biography

 

Michelle I-Hsiao Chen is a PhD candidate in Asian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation project looks at linguistic dissonance in Sinophone cinemas from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong.

Info

Title:             “Gendered Spaces”
Slot:              PANEL 7
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 14:30 – 16:00
Room:           Green Room
Host:             Tamara Kamerer

PRESENTERS

KOSTRZEWSKI, Mariusz (Warsaw University of Technology, Poland)
Sōshoku danshi – a new Japanese male model of life-style in public space of streets and magazines

BARANIAK-HIRATA, Zuzanna (Ochanomizu University, Japan)
Theatre and gendered spaces: Examining the visual representation of Takarazuka Revue’s gender roles

RÜCKERT, Jasmin (University of Vienna, Austria)
New Room for LGBT*IQ*A Representations in Japanese Television? Restrictions and opportunities of queer images in japanese TV series

KOSTRZEWSKI, Mariusz (Warsaw University of Technology, Poland)
Title Sōshoku danshi – a new Japanese male model of life-style in public space of streets and magazines
Abstract

 

Image of the aesthetics of East Asian fashion, known from western media, as general term “Japanese style”, focuses mainly on women’s taste and chic. The western literature treats little on the subject of Japanese man in the context of his approach to a self-aesthetics or fashion. The issues discussed in the paper concentrate around the image of nowadays Japanese man, as one of author’s research purposes is to efface lack of balance between the considerations concerning women’s style, widely discussed in the literature, contrary to the style-image of men. The paper discusses issues focused on the ambiguous subject of sōshoku danshi. Author endeavours to outline the figure of a Japanese man, a resident of a metropolis, his attitude and motivation to self-aesthetic and fashion. The starting point for the discussion about a new model is the sararīman model and the most common male fashion-styles appearing in the Japanese urban space. Sōshoku danshi model is investigated through three intertwining benchmarks, commented in the context of socio-cultural changes, i.e.: ambiguous entourage straight from fashion shows (“elite” space), an image popularized by fashion magazines (press release space) and finally the space of urban street fashion.

Question

What are the genesis and consequences of a new life-style male model (sōshoku danshi) occurrence in Japan?

Method

The Method is qualitative method, the purpose of which was to gather the fullest possible amount of information available in the scientific and popular literature.

Biography

 

The engineer with artistic touch, Assistant Professor at Warsaw University of Technology. Formerly an illustrator, presently focused on the research and teaching. Currently, he implements innovative forms of education at WUT within which he creates short animated pictures and executes prototypes with students. In everyday activities he consciously believes in the significance of Japanese art, which by transmitting artistic, artisan and technical values, serves the everyday, mundane life. He is more interested in seeking new questions than finding final answers.

BARANIAK-HIRATA, Zuzanna (Ochanomizu University, Japan)
Title Theatre and gendered spaces: Examining the visual representation of Takarazuka Revue’s gender roles
Abstract

 

All actresses in the popular all-female Takarazuka Revue specialize in performing as male or female characters. Existing studies of the Revue have tended to focus on the appeal of the male role players (otokoyaku), often overlooking their female counterparts (musumeyaku) and the gendered relations between the actresses. By examining visual representation of both musumeyaku and otokoyaku this paper explores interactions between the actresses of opposite gender roles and discusses gender relations as seen in the Takarazuka Revue. By analysing stage posters for plays performed by Takarazuka between 1998 and 2015, the study found that while the otokoyaku were the most represented group and their positioning within space often replicated stereotypical ideas of masculinity persistent in the Japanese culture (i.e. men positioned as the central figure, above and in front of women, their gaze meeting that of the viewer), the musumeyaku were playing an active role in not only expressing the femininity of the characters they portrayed, but also actively engaging and emphasizing the polarity between the two gender roles. The results confirm the image of the Takarazuka Revue as otokoyaku-centric but suggest that the musumeyaku play just as important role in ensuring the successful performance of genders portrayed on stage.

Question

How are the male and female genders represented in the Takarazuka Revue and what can we read from their portrayal of gender relations?

Method Quantitative analysis of 416 stage posters of plays performed by the Takarazuka Revue between 1998 and 2015.
Biography

 

Zuzanna Baraniak-Hirata is a PhD student at the Ochanomizu University, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies. She received her BA in Japanese studies at the University of Manchester and her MA in Gender and Development Studies at Ochanomizu University. She is a co-author of the article ‘How Japanese Artists Play with Gender – the Fluidity of Gender in Arts and Gender Bender Practices as Seen in the Takarazuka Revue and Yaoi Manga’ (forthcoming). She is currently conducting an ethnographic research about Takarazuka Revue’s gender performance.

RÜCKERT, Jasmin (University of Vienna, Austria)
Title New Room for LGBT*IQ*A Representations in Japanese Television? Restrictions and opportunities of queer images in Japanese TV series
Abstract

 

In 2015 Fuji TV announced the terebi dorama „Transit Girls“, that supposedly was the first TV series in Japan to center on a lesbian relationship. In the same year, the widely popular terebi dorama „gisou no fufu“ showing a gay male main character also aired on Fuji TV.

The new visibility of queer lives accomplished by the introduction of stories centered on lesbian/gay or bisexual characters is however, not unilaterally perceived as a positive trend in queer communities. On the one hand, it may help some individuals identifying as LGBT*IQ*A or questioning their gender and/or sexuality to see queer characters entering mainstream media. On the other side, where few representations of non-heteronormative relationships or characters are accessible, those stand in danger of reinforcing stereotypes and biases against LGBT*IQ*A identified people. Also, certain representations of queer topics may even be likely to stabilize norms of gender and sexuality.

In my presentation I will ask, whether the new images of non-heteronormative relationships can meet the demands of sexual minorities to see themselves represented in the mainstream media.

Question

What is new about the LGBT*I*Q*A characters in recent (2010-2016) examples in Japanese TV- series in comparison to earlier representations of queer characters and stories with a queer subtext?

Method TV-Series Analysis
Biography

 

Jasmin Rückert is a graduate student of Gender Studies and Japanese Studies at the University of Vienna. Her research interests include contemporary feminist movements and ideas in Japan, social activism in Japan and Queer Theory. She pursued her studies in Austria, France and Japan. Besides studying she spent much of her time as a representative in the Austrian Students Union and organizing feminist and queer projects in Vienna.

Title:             “Constructing Japaneseness”
Slot:              PANEL 6
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 14:30 – 16:00
Room:           Blue Room
Host:             Peter Fankhauser

PRESENTERS

ILC, Iztok       (translator of literature, Slovenia)
Making of Japan – How Literary Translations Construct the Source Culture

CHANG, Wei-Jung (Ochanomizu University, Japan)
The spaces and life styles surrounding with “Japaneseness”: Exploring the Japanophilia culture in Taiwan.

ALLGAIER, Albert (University of Vienna, Austria)
What does it mean to understand Japanese Contemporary Art. The discourse on Japanese contemporary art seen through the work of Murakami Takashi.

ILC, Iztok (translator of literature, Slovenia)
Title The Making of Japan – How do literary translations construct the source culture?
Abstract

 

Before the Internet the bulk of information about other cultures was obtained through printed media. The recipient of this did not have many opportunities to double-check the facts when the culture in question was far away, like Japan, for example. This offered fertile ground for the exoticization of the source culture.

This presentation will show how the image of Japan was constructed in Slovenia through indirect translations of literature from the 1960’s until 2005, when direct translations from Japanese began to be published. The fact that these earlier translations were indirect, and based on English or German renderings of the original texts, makes them even more interesting. In addition to translations, the representation of a source culture can also be observed through the study of so-called paratexts. These are, according to Gerard Genette, all the texts and other materials that appear around the main text in a printed volume: front and back covers, forewords, illustrations, footnotes, commentaries, blurbs, and so on.

I will thus compare a set of indirect translations with those directly translated from Japanese, which started to be published after 2005. In this way I will examine how current strategies of representation differ from those used in previous decades.

Question How do literary translations construct the source culture?
Method
Biography

 

Iztok Ilc (b. 1977) holds a BA in French language and literature and Japanese studies from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Ljubljana. For the past decade he has been working as a freelance literary translator. He has translated works by Endo Shusaku, Oe Kenzaburo, Murakami Ryu, Murakami Haruki, Mishima Yukio, Matsuura Rieko, Abe Kobo, Yasmina Khadra, the Marquis de Sade, and others.

CHANG, Wei-Jung (Ochanomizu University, Japan)
Title The spaces and life styles surrounding with “Japaneseness”: Exploring the Japanophilia culture in Taiwan.
Abstract

 

In Taiwan, the “Japanophilia” phenomenon burgeoned since the late 1990s. Although the attention to this phenomenon seemed to be substituted by the prevalence of Korean popular culture in recent years, Japanophilia materialized in the localization of “Japaneseness” in Taiwanese’s daily lives. In this paper, I aim to explore the significance of “Japaneseness” within the Taiwanese social context by examining how the Japanophilia culture has been embodied in both public landscapes and private spaces of Japanophiles’ lifestyles.

Using the research findings of fieldwork conducted in two representative consumption areas for Japanophiles and the life stories of eleven Japanophiles, the following implications will be discussed. First, materials or symbols of “Japaneseness” rooted deeply in both public and private areas and illustrates that Japanophilia culture continues to make up a significant aspect of Taiwanese social and cultural context. Second, Japanophiles’ narratives and the “Japaneseness” gaze reflect “Japaneseness” as the synonymous symbol of desirable modernity. Third, the appropriation, consumption and possession of “Japaneseness” reflect a reversal of roles between Taiwan and Japan, through the conquering of “Japaneseness” in Taiwan’s post-colonial and modernization social context.

Question

How has the Japanophilia culture been embodied in Taiwanese social context?

Method

Fieldwork in two representative consumption areas for Japanophiles and life-story research with eleven Japanophiles.

Biography

 

Weijung Chang is a Ph.D. candidate in the Division of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies at Ochanomizu University, Japan. Her research interests include Japanese popular culture, gender and sexuality. Her current research focuses on Japanophilia in Taiwanese context and applies the perspective of gender and sexuality. She presented her works in multiple languages. These include ‘Analyzing the Construction of Sexuality from “BL Fantasy”: A Case Study of Taiwanese Fujoshi’s Fantasy Practice in “Butler Cafés”’ (2013), ‘Analyzing the Relationship with “Japaneseness” from the Life Story of a Taiwanese Japanophile Girl’ (2014), and ‘Gendered/Sexualized Transformation of Japanophilia: The Symbolization and the Localization of “Japaneseness” in Taiwan’ (2015).

ALLGAIER, Albert (University of Vienna, Austria)
Title What does it mean to understand Japanese Contemporary Art
The discourse on Japanese contemporary art seen through the work of Murakami Takashi.
Abstract

 

My project aims to deconstruct the phenomenon of „Japanese Contemporary Art“ as a transnational process through which a national identity of Japan is constructed. With a discursive analysis of the reception of the contemporary artist Murakami Takashi and his theory of “Superflat Art” I want to show how images of Japan are created both in- and outside of Japan through various modes of production, reception and dissemination through the global system of contemporary art. Through this perspective, contemporary art becomes an interface for the oscillating momentum between the dichotomies of local and global, center and periphery, particular and universal.

Art has played a crucial role in the formation of the Japanese national identity, especially during the formation of the Meiji-State as a means of modernization. Between Westernisation and Auto-Orientalism, the idea of what is the specific “japanese” in japanese art is constantly contested and these historic precedents are necessary for a context sensitive understanding of contemporary japanese art. Contemporary japanese art has become a soft power, where the “japaneseness” of Japanese Contemporary Art is used strategically not only by artists and curators, but also academics and critics in- and outside of Japan. Murakami Takashi is considered to be the primary representative of japanese contemporary art but his persona and artistic activities are discussed controversially, reigniting the discussion on „authentic“ japanese art.

With this assumption I want to analyze the work of Murakami and its reception by integrating the japanese idea of bijutsu (Art) into the existing discourse on the supossed cultural uniqueness of Japan and reveal the underlying hegemony of the globalized art world and establish a theoretical framework to answer the question what it means to understand japanese contemporary art. Through a post-colonial perspective the paradox situation of japanese contemporary art both as colonizer and colonized reveals the subversive qualities of japanese contemporary art that transcend purely aesthetic questions and touches socio-cultural and political questions of transnational processes of  identity formation.

Question

How ‘japanese‘ is the art of Murakami Takashi?

Method

Discourse analysis of the Japanese and Euro-American reception of the work of Murakami

Biography

Albert Allgaier is PhD candidate at the University of Vienna and part of the Vienna Doctoral Academy

Info

Title:             “Workers, Verses, Wastelands”
Slot:              PANEL 5
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 12:00 – 13:00
Room:           Green Room
Host:             Erich Havranek

PRESENTERS

CHAPPELOW, Christian (Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany)
The Politics of Space in Postwar Japanese Poetry – From “Hiroshima” to “Fukushima”

WRIGHT, Kimberly (Indiana University, USA)
Poetry as Dissensus: Migrant Worker Writers in China

CHAPPELOW, Christian (Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany)
Title The Politics of Space in Postwar Japanese Poetry – From “Hiroshima” to “Fukushima”
Abstract

 

When the poetry group ARECHI proclaimed in 1951 that “the present is a waste land“, they set the tone for an idiomatic struggle for the meaning of space in post-war Japanese poetry. The call for the deconstruction of history, ideologies and poetics marked a thematic shift into spaces of artistic escapism and the dissolution of established forums of pre-war poetry, while in the meantime, faced with censorship and discrimination, atomic bomb victims fought dearly for a space to comment on their experiences.

Paradigmatic shifts in poetry production more recently saw the rise of alternative spaces of writing, strengthened by mass media and the digitalization of literature. The literary reactions to the “Fukushima” catastrophe unveiled the ever-changing and adapting spaces of poetry production in Japan. Twitter-poetry, new magazines and the Poetry Slam movement thus form an integral part of Japanese poetry today.

This lecture aims in the combination of micro and macro-level case studies to give an overview of literary production in Postwar Japanese Poetry, focusing on select events, actors and trends that can be viewed as a catalyst in the development of new spaces of writing and the literary concept of “space”, while also taking current developments into account.

Question

What were key factors in reinterpreting the concept of “space” in post-war Japanese poetry?

Method Literary History; Literary Theory; Philology
Biography

 

Christian Chappelow is a research fellow and PhD candidate at the department of Japanese Studies at Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany. Current research emphases include contemporary poetry, literary theory as well as politics and the representation of history in Japanese literature. Since 2011, particular focus has been given to the literary reactions to the “Fukushima” catastrophe of March 11th.

WRIGHT, Kimberly (Indiana University, USA)
Title Poetry as Dissensus: Migrant Worker Writers in China
Abstract

 

The development of social media platforms like Weibo and Wechat has been fundamental to the emergence of migrant worker poets in China. This paper will investigate how the production of poetry by migrant workers can be a transgressive act that protests against the social limitations placed on worker identities. By doing close readings of poetry by Chen Nianxi, Xu Lizhi, and Black Bird, we can see how the sensory experience and materiality of the workplace undergoes an aesthetic reconfiguration into poems which, unlike the iPhones and other commodities produced in these spaces, irrevocably bare the imprint of the worker’s presence and individuality.

In addition, this paper will examine the social and theoretical implications of the phenomenon of migrant worker poets in China. Their writing allows for the emergence of a new subjectivity – the worker poet. And by sharing their poetry with others on social media, these poets are extending their representation beyond the invisibility of the workplace and protesting against the appropriation of their bodies for a national economic agenda, as well as destabilizing the contradictions that exist between labor and art.

Question

What is the political significance of poetry written by Chinese migrant workers?

Method Textual analysis
Biography

I am a 2nd year M.A. student in Chinese Studies at Indiana University Bloomington. Originally from Bloomington, Indiana, I received my B.A. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations at University of Chicago in 2012, after which I worked in consulting in Shanghai for 3 years. My current research interests involve Chinese proletarian literature, contemporary literary practices in China, metaphors, and translation theory.

Title:             “Cultured Consumption”
Slot:              PANEL 4
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 12:00 – 13:00
Room:           Blue Room
Host:             Peter Mühleder

PRESENTERS

LAI, Aerin Elizabeth (Ochanomizu University, Japan)
Bodily Myths and the Rottenness of Fudanshi.

VRATANER, Markus (University of Vienna, Austria)
Rubbing shoulders with the stars: promotion concerts as places of encounter between enka singers and their fans

LAI, Aerin Elizabeth (Ochanomizu University, Japan)
Title Bodily Myths and the Rottenness of Fudanshi.
Abstract

 

This research paper sought to address firstly, the reproduction of heteronormativity within Yaoi manga, a genre of male homoerotica with a predominant female readership. Through content analysis, sexual difference between the masculinized ‘seme’ and the feminized ‘uke’ was found to be framed through character’s dialogues, character design and most often, during scenes of sexual intercourse.

Secondly, through interviews with heterosexual male readers of Yaoi manga – a subculture known as Fudanshi, this research aimed to understand the consumption processes of Yaoi manga among Fudanshi. I argued that sexual arousal experienced is a bodily transgression that ruptures the heteronormative discourse, of which my participants negotiated or negated through various strategies to reinstate their heterosexuality/masculinity.

Fudanshi who experience sexual arousal while consuming Yaoi manga legitimized their consumption through mockery, making use of the gender ambiguity of characters and their perceived femininity to reinstate their hetero-masculinity, and lastly, negated the homosexual themes in such manga by framing their consumption as part of a ‘courage test’.

Question

1. How is heteronormativity reproduced in male homoerotic Yaoi manga?

2. How do heterosexual males consuming such manga make sense of their own consumption vis-à-vis their heterosexuality and masculinity?

Method

Content analysis of Yaoi manga was conducted, along with qualitative interviews with six Fudanshi in Singapore.

Biography

 

Aerin Elizabeth Lai is currently a research student in Ochanomizu University, Faculty of Letters and Education, Department of Human and Social Sciences, in Tokyo. She graduated from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, majoring in Sociology. Her graduation thesis focused on the sexualized consumption of anime merchandise by Otakus in Singapore, and how they made use of various means to negotiate between their material reality and ‘anime’ reality. After which, as an independent researcher, she conducted research on Fudanshi – male readers of male homoerotica called Yaoi manga, in Singapore, titled ‘Bodily Myths and the Rottenness of Fudanshi’. The article will be part of a forthcoming publication – Anthropology Through the Experience of the Physical Body.

VRATANER, Markus (University of Vienna, Austria)
Title Rubbing shoulders with the stars: promotion concerts as places of encounter between enka singers and their fans
Abstract

 

Mini concerts with free admission at record shops and shopping centres, or so-­‐called tentō kashō kyanpēn, are an integral part in the marketing of a newly released enka song. Over the last twenty years, these campaigns have even gained in importance, given that especially for less established enka singers the opportunities to appear on television or radio have gradually decreased.

Besides the sales promotion of new songs, these concerts represent a crucial place for fan service. Amidst a small and manageable audience fans can experience their favourite singer face-­‐to-­‐face and, in addition to an autograph session after the performance, the purchase of the latest CD or audio cassette also entitles them to the obligatory snap-­‐shot together with the artist.

Fans even get to actively participate in the performance, since at the final reprise of the newly presented enka, more often than not, the audience is invited to sing it along with the artist. The fact that the production of enka is aiming at karaoke as a market becomes even more evident as the promotion concerts’ audience is repeatedly encouraged to assiduously perform the new song at karaoke cafés and bars, thus raising its popularity.

Question

Marketing strategies and target audiences for a supposedly fading genre of popular music

Method

The findings discussed in this paper are largely based on participant observation and expert interviews conducted in the context of my PhD dissertation.

Biography

 

Markus Vrataner is PhD candidate in Japanese studies at the University of Vienna. After he studied Japanese studies and Romance philology at the universities of Vienna, Denis Diderot (Paris VII) and Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris III), he graduated with an M.A. in 2008. His current research focuses on popular music in Japan and Portugal. He can be reached under markus_vrataner@yahoo.com.

Title:             “Placed History”
Slot:              PANEL 3
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 10:00 – 11:30
Room:           Green Room
Host:             Theresa Aichinger

PRESENTERS

ULMAN, Vít (Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic)
The cultural spaces in the late Japanese Middle Ages and their transformation

EICHLETER, Andreas (Heidelberg University, Germany)
Perception of Modernity – Backwards China, Progressive Japan

MA, Kuo-An (Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR)
Photography in Gold: Visual Production and Taiwan’s Indigenous Culture, 1930-1938

ULMAN, Vít (Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic)
Title The cultural spaces in the late Japanese Middle Ages and their transformation
Abstract

 

In this paper I would like to analyze the evolution of cultural production in the late Japanese Middle Ages and its transformation towards modern mass-culture. Using this case, I will be attempting to formulate a theory of what differentiates the modern culture from a pre-modern cultural stage.  The scope of the analysis will not be limited to the literary production of the period, it will also contain visual arts such as painting, sculpture, printmaking and architecture. I will also mention the function of the city of Kyoto as a cultural space.  We will deal with its cultural and physical destruction during the Ōnin war (1467 -1477) and the profound effect this destruction had on the development of the early modern Japanese culture and its dispersal to the periphery. This event combined with deep changes in the social structure affecting both the ruling classes and commoners transformed cultural production in Japan both in its content and form, as well as socioeconomically.
Question Did the changes in the production method and the loss of the main cultural place (Kyoto) bring about the cultural landscape of early modern Japan?
Method I will combine traditional methods such as close reading of primary sources with politically oriented criticism (center-periphery dynamics etc.)
Biography

 

Vít Ulman is a PhD candidate studying Literatures of Asia and Africa at Charles University of Prague. His main research topic is the literature of the Five Mountains (Gozan Bungaku), poetry written by Japanese medieval Zen monks in literary Chinese. He also teaches basic Japanese and Japanese linguistics at Charles University and Czech Technical University. This year he also started studying general linguistics at Charles University.
EICHLETER, Andreas (Heidelberg University, Germany)
Title Perception of Modernity – Backwards China, Progressive Japan
Abstract

 

At the forefront of East Asia’s integration into the family of nations in the middle of the 19th century were the so-called Treaty Ports. These ports, located on the coasts of China and Japan where foreign communities established themselves, became the primary zones of interaction between Asia and the West, overseeing a growing exchange of commodities, ideas, and ever-evolving mutual perceptions. In this paper, I examine the formation of images of backwardness and progress through the lens of the so-called Treaty Port Press. The image of the “Other” and the perception of their status compared to “Us” played an important role not only in the self-image of the Western Treaty Port community, but also in the dissemination of information about East Asia in the West. An analysis of Treaty Port journalistic output, primarily focusing on the North China Herald and the Japan Weekly Mail, suggests that a clear dichotomy of “backward China – progressive Japan” began to emerge as early as the 1860s, and that this image quickly solidified in the aftermath of the Meiji Restoration.
Question When and how did the image of a backwards China, progressive Japan emerge?
Method A Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis of newspapers.
Biography

 

I did my Diplomstudium of History at the University of Vienna, graduating with the thesis titled “The United States and the Opening of China and Japan in the 19th Century” supervised by Dr. Peer Vries. In fall 2014, I started a doctorate of History at the University of Heidelberg supervised by Dr. Harald Fuess. As part of my doctorate I took part in the Cross National Doctoral Course, an exchange program with Tohoku University, where I spent the year 2015/16 as a research assistant.
MA, Kuo-An (Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR)
Title Photography in Gold: Visual Production and Taiwan’s Indigenous Culture, 1930-1938
Abstract

 

This paper examines the space in which concepts of “indigenous/Indigenous culture” were molded and transacted through changing ways of visual production in colonial Taiwan, 1930s. As the evolving of photographic technique in early-twentieth-century Japan began to shape a visual medium with increasing significance within the arena of nationalizing mass culture, for Japan occupied Taiwan, the medium of photography served as the embodiment of Japan’s cultural advancement in “modern” science. While photographic media played a fundamental role in constructing a “colonial visual culture” that places the island with its Indigenous people into the category of “primitive Other,” with the rising popularity of photographic production among local communities, by the 1930s, the practice began to acquire different functions and meanings in the hands and eyes of local practitioners. Focusing on the story of photographer Peng, Rui-lin, the first Taiwanese graduate from Tokyo Photography School and producer of the first gold lacquer photography made in Taiwan, this paper argues that, by 1938, as a growing group of local professional photographers contributed to the “discovery” of local ways of seeing, photography became a crucial means of visual production that not only made visible the ways in which ideas for culture were visualized, but also the emerging “self-image” of a “local” Taiwan.

Keywords: Visual culture, colonial Taiwan, local space, photography, Taiwan history, modern Japan history

Question My research is mainly driven by a curiosity for the different roles and functions photographic images played in creating a cultural space for mediating transforming personal identities within the changing political landscape of colonization and globalization, faced by the East Asian world during the early twentieth century.
Method In my research, I make the study of images a method—examining the relationship between visual and textual “evidence,” and the way in which they were analytically structured within their specific historical and contexts, I explore the different means by which images could be used as “primary source” for historical studies.
Biography Ma, Kuo-An is a Ph. D candidate at Chinese University of Hong Kong currently working on a thesis with major focus on the historical study of photographic image and its visual economy in Taiwan’s colonial period. She received her B.A. in History from National Taiwan University, and an M.A. in Asian Studies from University of California, Berkeley.
INFO

Title:             “art/stage/space”
Slot:              PANEL 2
Date&Time: Friday 23rd September 2016, 10:00 – 11:30
Room:           Blue Room
Host:             Florian Purkarthofer

PRESENTERS

HRVATIN, Klara (University of Ljubjana, Slovenia)
Spaces and places as cultural production – Reflection on today’s space and place of the Japanese avant-garde movement of the 60ies
TAKEDA, Keiko (Tokyo University, Japan)
Dialogues on Identity: “Coming Out” and affect in the Performance Art Piece S/N (1994)
DE SETA, Gabriele (Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan)
The no-venue underground: Making experimental music scenes in Hong Kong

HRVATIN, Klara (University of Ljubjana, Slovenia)
Title

Places and spaces as cultural production – Reflection on today’s space and place of the Japanese avant-garde movement of the 60s

Abstract

 

The Sōgetsu art movement (Sōgetsu geijutsu undō 草月芸術運動) turned out to be one of the key happenings in the wide palette of Japanese avant-garde art in the early 60s of the 20th century. With its start in the year of 1958, it for almost decade and a half provided a rich experimental and innovative space for Japanese art.

Its common venue Sōgetsu Art Center, after which the movement received its name, provided a creative atmosphere most suitable for the next generation of Japanese art produced by a number of internationally known artists: the director of the Center/film director Hiroshi Teshigahara, playwright Kōbō Abe, musicians Tōru Takemitsu, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Yūji Takahashi, cartoonist Yōji Kuri, graphic designers Kōhei Sugiura, Kiyoshi Awazu, and dramatist Shūji Terayama, among others.

The research and archiving of the phenomenon of the movement and its common venue started at the beginning of the 21st century and got its online resource and a participatory platform only in the year of 2013.

This article will try to ilustrate how we can look on and define today’s place and space of the Sōgetsu art movement. Taking into consideration especially the ways of archiving and (re)production of some of the main works which were born out of the movement. How are those places and spaces in conflict with the main concept of the movement in the 60s, among which the experimental spirit and the cross-disciplinary cooperation were among two leading ideas? And how could those places and spaces be seen in the relation to the nowdays inevitable aspect of consumption?

Question Today’s space and place of the Japanese avant-garde movement of the 60s?
Method Qualitative research (semi-structured interviews, informal interviewing)
Biography

 

Klara Hrvatin completed her Ph.D. at the Osaka University, School of Letters, Division of Studies on Cultural Expression (Musicology and Theater Studies), and is currently a research fellow at the Faculty of Arts (Department of Asian Studies) at the University of Ljubljana. Her main interest areas include Japanese Contemporary Music, Arts and Aesthetics.

TAKEDA, Keiko (Tokyo University, Japan)
Title Dialogues on Identity:
“Coming Out”and affect in the Performance Art Piece S/N (1994)
Abstract

 

The performance art S/N (1994) premiered in 1994 at the Adelaide Festival in Australia and was created after Teiji Furuhashi (1960-1995) informed his close friends about his HIV-positive status in October 1992. Much attention has been paid to this performance piece and some critics indicated a political orientation or social criticism in S/N (Otori 1999; Kumakura 2000; Ikeuchi 2008 ; Yamada 2013 etc.). Moreover, critics indicate a non-hierarchical system of Dumb type(e.g. Nishido 1994), on the other hand, Furuhashi’s contribution to S/N (e.g. Dumb type 2000) has also been noted.

This presentation is based on an analysis of the recorded performance footage, interviews with the production’s members and media discourse as a context for the creation of S/N.

First, I will present how S/N problematized the issues of “coming out” and functions as a medium to present performers’ “coming out” through a performance piece in the context of the creative process.

“Coming out” has historically been an effective strategy for social change because, by insisting on their presence in society, minorities were able to alter the meaning of the category to which they had been assigned. Nevertheless, this disclosure entails risk because it inevitably forces the attachment of identity to a fixed category. However, S/N problematizes the power of “subjection” and celebrates flexibility or undecidability of identity.

Second, I will demonstrate how the presentation of identities in S/N avoids the problems of constructivism. Constructivism was very fashionable in Japan in the 1990s as a framework that could supposedly overcome identity politics and that celebrated flexibility or undecidability of identity. However, it also entails discommunication between “minorities” and “majorities,” performers and spectators in performance art. I conclude that S/N orients within post-

constructivism. And then, I will suggest how S/N orient spectator’s affect/emotion.

Biography

 

Project Assistant Professor of Interfaculty in Information Studies, Tokyo University.
DE SETA, Gabriele (Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan)
Title The no-venue underground: Making experimental music scenes in Hong Kong
Abstract

 

Often reduced ethnomusicologically to Cantopop and its melancholic decadence, Hong Kong has also a peculiar and distinctive pole of experimental music in Asia. Hong Kong’s experimental music scenes are profoundly shaped by their struggle for existence in a city notoriously ungenerous in terms of space and support to alternative and non-institutional forms of creative production. Between 2012 and 2015 I have lived in Hong Kong and participated in the city’s patchwork of experimental music scenes. While playing more than twenty shows and attending many more – from small-scale happenings to larger concerts and festivals – and collaborating on live sets and studio recordings with different combinations of local and international musicians, I kept noticing how one of the defining characteristics of Hong Kong’s experimental music scenes was their embrace of spatial instability, of a sense of unmooredness from performance places necessary to the sustainability of music-making in the city that I describe, in this short presentation, as Hong Kong’s “no-venue underground”.
Question How does the scarcity and instability of performance spaces influence the construction of experimental music scenes?
Method I use an ethnographic approach grounded on long-term participation and engagement with local musicians, organizers and audiences.
Biography

 

Gabriele de Seta is a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica in Taipei, Taiwan. His research work, grounded on ethnographic engagement across multiple sites, focuses on digital media practices and vernacular creativity in contemporary China. He also experiments with ways of bridging anthropology and art practice.
Info

Title: “Movie Theatres in Japan” [expert panel]
Slot: PANEL 1
Date&Time: Thursday 22nd September 2016, 14:30 – 16:00
Room: Blue Room
Host: Tamara Kamerer

Presenters

UEDA, Manabu (Nihon University, Japan)
Relationships between Silent Film and Movie Theatre in Japan during the 1910s
SCHERMANN, Susanne (Meiji University, Japan)
In the middle of the edge. Movie theatres in rural Japan
DOMENIG, Roland (Meiji Gakuin University, Japan)
The “Underground Theatre Scorpio” as catalyst of Japanese counterculture in the late 1960s

Panel Abstract

The cinema space serves as a venue for contact between film and spectators and constitutes a point of transition between a possible world created for the screen and the real world in which we spectators live. The cinema is a place where it can become evident who we are and where we stand. Particular images, scenes or even whole films can extend into the everyday staging of ourselves, into how we perceive, think and talk. Cinema spaces provide us with a presence and shared intensity, which we then carry with us when we leave the cinema and step out onto the streets.

The three papers of this panel examine cinema spaces in Japan from three different perspectives. The first looks into the specifics of movie theatres in the so-­‐called “silent era” which in Japan was strongly dominated by the film narrator who stood at the core of the Japanese movie theatre experience. The second paper considers the convergence of cinema space and urban city space in the late 1960s by examining the Underground Theatre Scorpio in Shinjuku. Finally the third paper surveys two movie theatres located in the periphery of rural Japan.

UEDA, Manabu (Nihon University, Japan)
Title Relationships between Silent Film and Movie Theatre in Japan during the 1910s
Abstract

 

In this presentation, I will consider the context of exhibition with regard to the narrator and movie theatre in the 1910s silent era. The narrator (benshi) was integral in composing the narrative of the Japanese film in the silent era. Similarly, movie theatres were spaces in which Japanese film vernacular was promoted.

Though narrators played the most significant role in exhibition of the silent film, they also had an impact on film production. Furthermore, the editing style of the long-take shots indicates another aspect aside from the influence of the narrators. We should remember that in the early modern period, kowairo was emerging as a substitute art for kabuki. Also in the 1910s, viewing a kabuki exhibition and other performing arts was expensive compared to the cost of movie theatre admission. The style of using long-take shots can be considered to be an imitation of theatre scenes.

The opinion that the Japanese film exhibitions were an alternative to the theatre also applies to the movie theatre space in the 1910s. Movie theatre buildings in the 1910s differed considerably from the simple show-tent used during the early film era. These movie theatres had features that imitated the theatres exhibiting kabuki and shinpa plays (the modern drama of the Meiji and Taisho era). Appearances created by using Renaissance- or Secession-style decoration is a result of inexpensive construction methods devised in the early 1910s.

The movie theatres’ imitation of theatres can be more characteristically confirmed by considering the interiors of the movie theatres. This form of movie theatre architecture is closely related to the fact that the presentation-style of Japanese films was strongly influenced by Japanese theatre such as kabuki and shinpa plays in the 1910s. It is thought that many audiences enjoyed Japanese films as an alternative to the theatre.

As described above, not only did Japanese films of this era provide a representation of theatrical performances on the screen, but the movie theatres also had the characteristics of alternative theatres.

Biography UEDA Manabu. Born in Chiba, Japan. Research Associate of the Tsubouchi Memorial Theatre Museum, Waseda University, and Lecturer at Nihon University. Area of expertise: film and media. Completed the Doctoral Program at the Ritsumeikan University Faculty of Letters. His written works include Nihon eiga sôsôki no kôgyô to kankyaku (Waseda University Press, 2012).
SCHERMANN, Susanne (Meiji University, Japan)
Title In the middle of the edge. Movie theatres in rural Japan
Abstract

 

More than in other countries, movie theaters in Japan in the first decennia were built mainly in the big cities, not in the countryside, also due to the high costs of the live performers. Many movie theaters were former Kabuki stages that were adapted to fit the big screen. The present paper gives two examples of movie theaters in the countryside, one in Fukushima north of Tokyo, the other in Tokushima on Shikoku.
Biography

 

Susanne SCHERMANN. Born in Vienna, Austria. Studies in Art Education at the University of Applied Arts, Vienna; MA (thesis on the French painter Suzanne Valadon). Master and doctor course in Film Studies at Waseda University, Tokyo; Ph.D. (dissertation on the Japanese film director Naruse Mikio). Professor at Meiji University, Tokyo.

DOMENIG, Roland (Meiji Gakuin University, Japan)

Title The “Underground Theatre Scorpio” as catalyst of Japanese counterculture in the late 1960s
Abstract

 

Shinjuku in the late 1960s was the centre of Japan’s youth culture, home of Japanese avant-garde and counter-culture and arena of political agitation and violent conflicts. Situated at the heart of Shinjuku was the Art Theatre Shinjuku Bunka, the flagship of the Art Theatre Guild (ATG), the experimental laboratory of Japanese cinema. One of the pivotal showcases for Shinjuku’s brimming counter-culture, the Shinjuku Bunka was also one of the crucial catalysts for the avant-garde and underground culture of Shinjuku. By examining the Underground Theatre Scorpio, established in the basement of the Art Theatre Shinjuku Bunka, the paper will explore the intersection of cultural, social and political changes in late 1960s Japan.
Biography

 

Roland DOMENIG. Born in Vienna, Austria. Associate Professor at the Department of Art Studies, Meiji Gakuin University, Tokyo. Also works as film curator, film festival consultant and subtitle translator. Special interests: Japanese film history; independent cinema; movie theaters and alternative exhibition spaces.

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